Fieldwork FAQs
  1. Why is Idaho Power asking permission to enter my property?

    Contractors have been hired by Idaho Power to gather a variety of data to continue development of a line route for the proposed B2H project. Collected information will be used by Idaho Power to refine the proposed route where necessary and will be used by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Oregon Department of Energy – Energy Facility Siting Council (EFSC) in their permitting processes.

  2. Does this mean the transmission line will be on my property?

    No, the project is in the early stages of development and this work will gather data that will be used to determine the exact line route. As a starting point, this work is being done along the line route Idaho Power has proposed. Additional work, along alternatives identified as part of the federal and state permitting processes, may be required.

  3. How will I be notified?

    Initial requests to enter private property will be delivered via certified mail and will include a consent form. Within one week of the letter being sent, a representative will contact you to discuss permission and any special conditions that need to be considered (e.g. locked gates, agriculture operations). Upon receiving permission to enter your property a representative will inform you at least 24 hours before any fieldwork is to begin.

  4. What if my property is damaged?

    Idaho Power will make every effort to minimize impacts to private property and will repair any damage caused by this work. Idaho Power does not anticipate that any damage will occur because the work will not include any ground disturbing activities or heavy equipment. Crews will access your property on foot or use all terrain vehicles (ATVs), snowmobiles and four-wheel drive vehicles to gain access to locations.

  5. What types of fieldwork will occur?

    Fieldwork will include terrain and access reviews, cultural field surveys and biological field surveys. For more information, please see Idaho Power's fieldwork page and/or watch the Looking at the Land video.

    For more information about cultural and biological surveys, review the Private-Property Owner Concerns Regarding Cultural and Biological Resources FAQs, as well as the Fieldwork Glossary of Terms.

  6. Will Idaho Power leave markers on my property?

    Land surveyors will need to set control monuments along the proposed project corridor; however, no monuments are planned on private land at this time. The control monuments will be located every 2 to 5 miles along the currently proposed alignment and within 1 mile of the alignment (as measured perpendicularly). These monuments will consist of a 24 inch long anchored galvanized steel spike with a 2 inch diameter aluminum cap. A standard steel fencepost will also be set alongside each monument for easy location and recovery.

    Once these monuments have been established and set in place, a GPS base unit will take a reading over each one to establish precise positions and coordinates. These control monuments will then remain in place indefinitely to allow for precise and repeatable control positioning for Idaho Power as long as the transmission line is in use.