WORKING WITH LANDOWNERS
  1. Would I be compensated for giving Idaho Power right of way to cross my land? What if my land is taken through eminent domain? If I am compensated, who determines the value of my property?

    Yes, you would be compensated for the right of way, regardless of how it is acquired. If the acquisition process proceeds through the court, the court determines the compensation. The value of the right of way is determined using several different sources, including the assessor's office, an appraiser's corridor study and local comparable sales. Eminent domain is the last and least-favored option for acquiring right of way.

    Visit Idaho Power’s Landowners page for more information.

  2. How does Idaho Power acquire easements for private property?

    Idaho Power purchases an easement on private land. Easements give Idaho Power the right to use land owned by an individual for a specific purpose. Compensation for the easement is a one-time payment made to the property owner in return for the grant of access to build the power line and subsequently operate and maintain the line. Because the property is still owned by the property owner, the owner may use the ground within the power line easement as desired, while honoring the negotiated terms of the easement agreement.

  3. Who considers the potential effects of the proposed and alternate routes on private landowners?

    BLM and ODOE-EFSC are responsible for reviewing the potential effects of the proposed corridors on land throughout the project area, regardless of whether it is public or private land.

    As part of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, BLM and other participating agencies must consider the impacts of the proposed project on ecological resources, visual resources, cultural resources, land use, public health and safety, local and regional socioeconomic conditions and other resources. These resources are evaluated in the environmental impact statement (EIS), which will be available to the public for review once developed.

    The federal agencies will use the EIS analysis to make separate final decisions to approve or deny the project on BLM and USFS administered federal lands. The federal agencies do not have the authority to approve or deny any portion of the project on private lands.

    In Oregon, the proposed project is undergoing the Oregon energy facility siting process. EFSC will ultimately decide whether to approve or deny Idaho Power’s application to build this facility in Oregon. EFSC will approve the project only if it meets EFSC's Energy Facility Siting Standards for land use, safety and environmental impacts. EFSC siting standards apply on both public and private lands in Oregon, excluding land owned by Oregon’s nine federally recognized tribes, and do not apply in Idaho.

  4. Can a landowner restrict access over roads associated with a power line that is built across private property?

    The landowner can restrict access to anyone; however, Idaho Power's right of way or easement allows Idaho Power employees to access the line at any time unless otherwise negotiated in the easement agreement.

  5. Can Idaho Power restrict landowner access within and/or across the right of way or easement?

    Idaho Power's only restriction across the right of way or easement is a height restriction. For safety reasons, Idaho Power recommends that easement lands are not crossed with anything that may make contact with the transmission line, such as a crane or other equipment that may be tall enough to make contact.

  6. Are there benefits for counties or cities to site lines within their jurisdictions?

    Property tax is paid to each county by Idaho Power. The amount of the property tax is based upon the county's share of Idaho Power's total assessed market value. If all other things remain constant, the more property investments the company makes in a county, the more market value it will receive resulting in additional property tax the company will pay in that county.

  7. Would the proposed lines interfere with ongoing agricultural practices, such as pivot irrigation?

    Idaho Power will work with individual landowners to coordinate the timing of construction to minimize short-term impacts to agriculture. Over the long term, most agricultural activities can proceed with the transmission line in place.

  8. Is there a yearly lease for operating and maintaining a transmission line on private land?

    Idaho Power purchases an easement on private land. Easements give Idaho Power the right to use land owned by an individual for a specific purpose. The easement is a one-time payment made to the property owner in return for the grant of access to build the power line and subsequently operate and maintain the line. Because the property is still owned by the property owner, the owner may use the ground within the power line easement as desired, while honoring the negotiated terms of the easement agreement.

  9. How would the project impact Idaho Power utility rates?

    Typically, investment in additional transmission facilities and their associated operating expenses are included in future rates at the time the facilities start to provide service. Transmission investments are reviewed by regulatory commissioners prior to the inclusion in rates. It is too soon to tell how this project would affect utility rates for Idaho Power customers.